Vitamins and fibre in the gluten free diet

Vitamins and fibre in the gluten free diet

Vital to your health!

A well-balanced diet with sufficient vitamins and fibre not only increases your physical performance but also your well-being. The gluten free food pyramid, which divides healthy and less healthy foods into levels, also provides assistance. Fruit and vegetables, for example, are elemental and should be generous on the menu as they contain lots of vitamins, minerals and fibre. If you want to know exactly what amounts are currently recommended, you will find them in the reference values of the German Nutrition Society. If you also want to do something good for your health, you can also get information on gluten free cleansing.

The power of vitamins

Vitamins are indispensable for your health. Since the body is unable to produce them, you have to absorb them through nutrition. Whoever has a vitamin deficiency quickly feels tired and exhausted. Because vitamins play many vital roles in the body:

  • They control and stimulate metabolic processes.
  • They provide the body with energy and strength.
  • They support the immune system.

There are 13 vitamins in total, divided into two groups:

  • the fat-soluble vitamins (A, D, E and K)
  • and the water-soluble vitamins (all B vitamins and vitamin C).

In a balanced, gluten free diet, the body can store a small reserve of fat-soluble vitamins, so they do not necessarily have to be represented daily in the diet. The water-soluble vitamins cannot be stored in the body, which is why it is important to eat fresh fruit, vegetables, dairy and whole grains daily.

Fresh vitamins preferred

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The rising trend towards convenience foods means that many people think that they can compensate with vitamin pills. But those who eat varied meals can do without dietary supplements; experts from leading nutrition companies, such as the DGE, agree. Only in a few situations do dietary supplements really make sense: Vitamin D, for example, is produced in the skin under the influence of sunlight. This can be scarce in winter. Pregnant women and women trying to have children are often advised to take folic acid, which helps develop the unborn child's nervous system.

And not only vegetarians and vegans have to be careful to consume enough vitamin B12, which is found almost exclusively in meat, eggs, cheese and milk, but also people with coeliac disease, because they are often unable to deliver sufficient amounts of vitamin B12 in the intestine. If the body does not get enough vitamin B12 from the diet, it should be substituted with medicated or fortified foods.

More fibre, more well-being

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Fibres are named after a time when they were regarded as superfluous fibre, not least because of their indigestibility. Today, we know that fibre has many valuable functions and is indispensable for your health. Fibre is a small helper for digestion and contributes to well-being. They are true fitness trainers for the gut and fulfil important functions for the maintenance of an intact intestinal flora. By switching to a gluten free diet, it may initially cause constipation. Here, fibre and drinking enough liquids can be a good relief. At least 30 g of fibre per day should, according to the recommendation of the German-speaking food companies (D-A-CH) be on a balanced nutrition plan - and that's a lot.

Dietary fibre: natural digestion master

Dietary fibres are plant fibres that the human body cannot or can only partially digest. They are found mainly in the cell walls and outer layers of plant foods, such as vegetables, oilseeds, nuts and various types of fruit. Also, resistant starch from potatoes, legumes and gluten free cereals are true all-rounders. Fibre in the body plays different roles:

  • They stimulate intestinal activity and promote healthy digestion.
  • They increase the lubricity of the chyme, serve as swelling substance in the intestine and ensure a fast and long-lasting satiety.
  • The binding power of fibre is important so that minerals, trace elements, fat-soluble substances and vitamins are transported.
  • The intake of fibre promotes the growth of lactic acid bacteria in the colon.

People who eat a lot of fibre also reduce the risk of many diet-related illnesses. In particular, dietary fibre from whole grain cereals have a beneficial effect on cholesterol. In addition, a high intake of fibre is likely to lower the risk of Type 2 diabetes mellitus, high blood pressure and coronary heart disease.

 

Source:
https://www.5amtag.de/wissen/obst-und-gemuese-was-steckt-drin/
https://www.dge-medienservice.de/ballaststoffe.html

 

What contains which vitamin and what does it do?

Fat-soluble vitamins

Vitamin a

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  • What is it good for?
    Eyes, growth, fertility; strengthens skin and mucose membranes; important for the immune system
  • What contains it?
    Liver, butter, cheese, eggs. Pre-stages of the vitamin can be found in yellow and orange vegetables and fruit, as well as in kale and spinach, and can be converted to Vitamin A by the body
  • Possible symptoms of a deficiency
    Increased susceptibility to infection, reduced sharpness of vision, dry eyes, dry skin and mucose membrane
  • Diminished or lost through...
    20% through heat and light under the influence of oxygen

Vitamin D

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  • What is it good for?
    Regulates calcium and phosphate. Vital for strong teeth and bones
  • What contains it?
    The body can make the vitamin itself when exposed to sunlight. In oil-rich fish like herring, eel or salmon, mushrooms, egg yolk, some types of cheese and other dairy products
  • Possible symptoms of a deficiency
    Rickets in children (deformation of the bones); osteomalacia in adults (characterised by bone softening); fatigue and increased susceptibility to infections
  • Diminished or lost through...
    10% through exposure to oxygen and light

Vitamin E

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  • What is it good for?
    Protects cells and arteries from the adverse effects of damaging substances, so-called free radicals. Strengthens the immune system and reduces inflammation
  • What contains it?
    In vegetable oils, nuts, avocados, green leafy vegetables
  • Possible symptoms of deficiencies
    Disorders of the nervous system, disrupted motor coordination, disrupted vision, concentration disorders
  • Diminished or lost through...
    10% through exposure to light and heat

Vitamin K

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  • What is it good for?
    Supports blood coagulation and bone metabolism
  • What contains it?
    In green vegetables, cabbage, pulses, egg yolk, sunflower oil, liver
  • Possible symptoms of deficiency
    Blood coagulation conditions, spontaneous haemorrhaging, in newborn infants this frequently results in cerebral haemorrhaging
  • Diminished or lost through...
    Minimum levels through exposure to light

Water soluble vitamins

Vitamin B1 (Thiamin)

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  • What is it good for?
    Supports energy metabolism in the cells of the body
  • What contains it?
    Meat (especially pork), offal, wholegrain cereals, pulses, potatoes
  • Possible symptoms of deficiency
    Fatigue, loss of appetite, memory loss and even confusion, oedemata, loss of skeletal muscle, weakened heart muscles
  • Diminished or lost through...
    30% through exposure to heat, light, oxygen and leaching in water

Vitamin B2 (Riboflavin)

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  • What is it good for?
    Part of numerous biochemical processes in all areas of metabolism
  • What contains it?
    Milk, cheese, liver, eggs, meat, fish, vegetables such as asparagus and spinach, various types of cabbage
  • Possible symptoms of deficiency
    Cracks in the corners of the mouth (known as rhagades), inflammation of the oral mucose membrane and of the cornea; probably contributes to the formation of cataracts
  • Diminished or lost through...
    20% through exposure to light

Vitamin B6 (Pyrodoxin)

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  • What is it good for?
    Has an important function in protein metabolism, construction and breakdown of amino acids
  • What contains it?
    In kidneys, liver, meat, fish, nuts, cereals, cabbage, green beans, bananas, avocados
  • Possible symptoms of a deficiency
    Inflammation in the mouth area; changes in the skin, anaemia, numbness in the extremities of the body
  • Diminished or lost through...
    30-45% through leaching; sensitive to light, heat, dryness

Vitamin B12 (Cobalamin)

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  • What is it good for?
    Important role in the formation of red blood cells and influences protein metabolism
  • What contains it?
    In milk, cheese, eggs, fish, liver, kidneys
  • Possible symptoms of a deficiency
    Changes in the blood count (especially anaemia); fatigue; burning mouth syndrome, numbness. Groups at risk of insufficient Vitamin B12 intake are vegans and the elderly
  • Diminished or lost through...
    12% through exposure to heat and leaching in water

Vitamin C

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  • What is it good for?
    Supports the formation of collagen; important for the immune system; protects the body from exposure to cell-damaging substances, known as free radicals; improves the absorption of iron in the intestine
  • What contains it?
    In acerola cherries, seabuck thorn, rosehip, sweet peppers, kiwis, blackcurrants, redcurrants, broccoli, cabbage, citrus fruits
  • Possible symptoms of a deficiency
    Scurvy - characterised by slow wound repair, bleeding gums and atrophy of the muscles; increased susceptibility to infection
  • Diminished or lost through...
    50% on average through exposure to heat and oxygen, but can also be more

Biotin (Vitamin B7)

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  • What is it good for?
    Important component of various enzymes, has a number of functions in metabolism
  • What contains it?
    Liver, egg yolk, soy beans, spinach, nuts, mushrooms, oats
  • Possible symptoms of a deficiency
    Skin eczema and hair loss accompanied by fatigue and nausea; depression, dizziness, distorted awareness of haptic stimuli
  • Diminished or lost through...
    Minimal; almost completely impervious to heat

Folic acid

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  • What is it good for?
    Important for cell division and growth processes
  • What contains it?
    Liver, asparagus, salad, spinach, tomatoes, egg yolk, wholegrain products
  • Possible symptoms of a deficiency
    Anaemia; promotes arteriosclerosis and dementia. Folic acid deficiencies during pregnancy can lead to malformation of the unborn child.
  • Diminished or lost through...
    30-90% through exposure to heat, oxygen, light and leaching

Niacin Vitamin B3

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  • What is it good for?
    Supports bio-chemical processes for energy supply and for all metabolic processes in the cells
  • What contains it?
    Meat, fish, eggs, milk, peanuts, seeds, offal, wholegrain cereals
  • Possible symptoms of a deficiency
    General weakness, the skin condition pellagra, which is associated with dermatitis, diarrhoea and neurological problems
  • Diminished or lost through...
    10% through leaching in water

Pantothenic acid Vitamin B5

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  • What is it good for?
    Involved in bio-chemical reactions, e.g. lipid metabolism and carbohydrate metabolism, as well as in the synthesis of cholesterol
  • What contains it?
    Meat, fish, liver, egg, milk, cereals, pulses
  • Possible symptoms of a deficiency
    Fatigue, stomach pain, feelings of numbness, tingling or burning in the feet
  • Diminished or lost through...
    30% through exposure to heat and leaching in water